Archive | College Life

College Students and Credit Cards

To make money, some universities are offering up their own students to the credit card industry as sacrificial lambs. Credit card issuers have happily been paying schools for access to their students. Consequently, it’s been common to see credit card marketers at tables stacked with cheap bling on campus quads. They will gladly give students […]

Continue Reading 2

The Secret to Studying for Finals

My daughter Caitlin called the other day to tell me how she thought she fared on her Spanish final. She said her hands were still shaking — not because she was nervous about the exam — but because she had been gobbling up chocolate-covered coffee beans to stay awake. I concluded that getting pumped up […]

Continue Reading 0

One Mom's Worry: Drinking in College

Go ahead and call me naive. I didn’t realize how serious and pervasive the college drinking problem was until my own daughter headed off to school. In high school, my husband and I considered ourselves very lucky because Caitlin and most of her friends didn’t drink at all. But I’d be surprised, however, if any […]

Continue Reading 0

One in 5 College Students Transfer

A new report from the federal National Center for Education Statistics documents there are more transfer students at four-year colleges than you’d think. Nearly one in five students transfer from one four-year college to another. When my daughter’s friends came home from their freshmen year in college this summer, most of them were happy campers. […]

Continue Reading 0

Attending College at Home

One way to shrink the cost of college is to never show up. A story in The New York Times today reports that an increasing number of college students are taking online classes because of the high price of gasoline. With at least 79% of college students living off campus, the exploding price of gas […]

Continue Reading 0

Getting an Academic Bargain Across State Lines

If you want to attend a public university outside your state, the price tag can often be outrageously high. It’s easy to understand why. States are usually only interested in holding down the costs for their own residents. You might, however, be able to capture a higher-ed bargain if your state maintains a reciprocal agreement […]

Continue Reading 8